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Depression

Depression in Women

Depression in Women
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Depression in Women Depression is a common and serious medical illness that negatively affects
• How you feel
• The way you think
• Your action
It can lead to a range of emotional and physical harms and it can decrease the ability of a person to function appropriately (American Psychiatric Association, Division 12, 2012).

Depression in Women is indicated as sadness or depressive mood for most of the time with loss of interest or pleasure in activities. Changes in appetite or weight loss or gain u It can lead to a range of emotional and physical harms and it can decrease the ability of a person to function appropriately (American Psychiatric Association, It can lead to a range of emotional and physical harms and it can decrease the ability of a person to function appropriately (American Psychiatric Association, It can lead to a range of emotional and physical harms and it can decrease the ability of a person to function appropriately (American Psychiatric Association, nrelated to dieting as well as trouble in sleeping or sleeping too much. It is referred as loss ofenergy or increased fatigue.

The thing worthy to be noted is that depression can only be referred if all the symptoms remained constant till six months (DSM-5) 
Depression is almost twice probable to affect women as compare to men. It has different contributing causes in women than it does in men.
National Center for Health Statistics showed that more than 8% of adults older than 20 years old accounted having depression during a given two-week period. Women (10.4%) are almost twice than men (5.5%) to have depression.
While the contributing factors in women include reproductive hormones, a differing female response to stress, and social pressures that are unique to a woman’s life experiences.

Major Depression

It is a severe form of depression where a woman loses her ability to find pleasure in activities once measured enjoyable. In addition, it affects a woman’s ability to work, sleep, and eats in normal and effective manners. It usually negatively impacts interpersonal and social relationships. Postpartum Depression It is a category of depression that prevails in women after their child birth. It is also referred as baby blues.

Typical symptoms of depression begin in the months next to birth and in some women, they can happen while still pregnant.
Persistent Depressive Disorder Considered as milder form of depression, this is an general depressed mood that remains for two years or more.

Premenstrual Dysphoric Disorder

It is a type of depression that is tied to a woman’s menstrual cycle. In this form of depression, severe mood swings, anxiety, and negative thoughts present themselves in the week prior to the start of menstruation and dissipate once the menstrual period begins. 
Depressive symptoms are severe enough to negatively impact interpersonal

relationships and interfere with daily activities.
Depression can predict suicide too. Whereas there is also dramatic gender differences in lifetime risk of suicide in depression. About 7 percent of men with a lifetime history of depression will die by suicide. Only 1 percent of women with a lifetime history of depression will die by suicide. Hence the ratio of suicidal ideation is less in women.

Some of the distinguishing factors in how depression differs between women vs. men include:
• Women feel anxious and scared while men feel guarded
• Women blame themselves for the depression while men blame others
• Women commonly feel sad when depressed on the other hand men tend to feel irritable and angry
• Women turn to food and friends to self-medicate while men turn to alcohol, TV, sex, or sports to self-medicate
• Women feel lethargic and nervous as men feel agitated and restless
• Women easily talk about their feelings of self-doubt and despair and men hide feelings of self-doubt and despair-considering it a sign of weakness

What Causes Depression in Women?


There are a multitude of genetic, hormonal, psychological, and social factors that come into play when citing the cause of depression in women.

Biology and Hormones

It is witnessed that depression runs in families. Its biological proof that some genetic makeups are more prone to depression, while are not. Although, environmental factors are also interact with genetic predispositions. 
Other biological and hormonal factors are also likely to increase your chances of suffering from depression. 

Depression in Women

Issues with pregnancy, fertility, pre-menopause, menopause, and menstrual cycles increase women’s risk factors of developing depression. Most of these are due to hormonal imbalances and rapid fluctuations in reproductive hormones. Health problems, in general, especially those of chronic illness or disability can prompt depression in women, as can medical life changes such as frequent dieting and smoking cessation.

Psychological Causes

They are more common in case of than men. Women are more likely to rehash negative thoughts during bouts of depression. While it is a normal response to cry, talk with friends, and rehash why it is you are in your depressive state. Research has shown that ruminating about depression can cause it to last longer and even make it worse.

In contrast, men tend to distract themselves from their depressive state which has been shown to reduce the duration of symptoms. Additional psychological factors that tend to affect women over men are negative body images and stress-induced depression. Women are more prone to stress than men because their increased levels of progesterone have been shown to prevent stress hormones from leveling out. Negative body image issues usually begin in adolescence and seem to be correlated with the onset of puberty in women.

Social Causes

Like coping skills, choice of relationships, and lifestyle choices affect women differently than men. As a woman, you are more likely to develop depression from marital or relationship problems, work-life balance issues, financial troubles, and stressful life events, including the loss of a loved one.
In addition to the biological, psychological, and social causes of depression mentioned above, the National Institute of Health indicates the following are also increased risk factors of depression in women:

• Death of a parent before age 10
• Job loss, relationship problems, divorce
• Physical or sexual abuse during childhood
• History of mood disorders
• Use of certain medications
Depression can predict suicide too. Whereas there is also dramatic gender differences in lifetime risk of suicide in depression. Whereas about 7 percent of men with a lifetime history of depression will die by suicide, only 1 percent of women with a lifetime history of depression will die by suicide. Hence the ratio of suicidal ideation is less in women.

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